Social Media: How & What We Consume

Another great info graphic from visual.ly
Social Media: How & What We Consume
by meghillman. Browse more infographics.

Humanizing Big Data

Humanizing Big Data Infographic highlights the need to enable more employees with access to Big Data and the ability to analyze it in the context with other relevant data. These findings are based on a new global survey conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit and Alteryx. Download additional high-resolution versions of the Infographic or a free copy of the complete survey, Big Data and The Democratisation of Decisions, on the Alteryx Website at http://www.alteryx.com/infographics/humanizing-big-data-infographic
Humanizing Big Data


timelightbox:


Michael Christopher Brown for TIME
As Sandy drew near, TIME asked five photographers — Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes — to document the hurricane and its aftermath via Instagram.
See more of the photos here.

Pictured: Water pours into a parking garage on Avenue C in Manhattan

timelightbox:

Michael Christopher Brown for TIME

As Sandy drew near, TIME asked five photographers — Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes — to document the hurricane and its aftermath via Instagram.

See more of the photos here.

Pictured: Water pours into a parking garage on Avenue C in Manhattan

timelightbox:

A Cover for the Ages
Last week, during one of the worst storms in the city’s history, the staff at New York Magazine was relocated from their downtown offices, which had lost power, to a temporary office in midtown to produce its issue. At 3 p.m. on Tuesday, editor-in-chief Adam Moss called an emergency meeting to start brainstorming ideas to fill out a lineup for an issue that would go to press on Friday.
The challenge was to come up with an entire issue in 48 hours that would not only encompass different photographic approaches, but memorialize a moment in time. As director of photography Jody Quon and her team started brainstorming photographers—work by Jeff Liao, Pari Dukovic, Joseph Rodriguez, Christopher Griffith and others would ultimately appear in the issue—she knew there was one picture that had to be made.
“We needed to show New York from the air,” she said. “We had to make that picture: the delineation of the lights on and off.”
On Wednesday, Leonor Mamanna, a photo editor at New York Magazine, called the Dutch photographer Iwan Baan on the off chance that he’d be in New York. (He is based in Amsterdam). Baan is a superb photographer of urban architecture from all perspectives, including the air. Baan’s work first appeared in the magazine last year. Mamanna and Baan connected around 4 p.m. on Wednesday. In an email from Haiti this morning, he wrote “Getting to the heliport and getting a car and gas was the most difficult! It was an hour flight to Manhattan, one hour over the city and another hour back, freezing cold, without doors in the heli.”
It takes superb skill to make a picture over the city, out of a helicopter in pitch blackness. How did he do it? “I’ve done this shot of Manhattan many times. So I knew how I wanted to show the two cities,” he wrote. “A pitch black Manhattan and a vivid and thriving city. At the bottom left you see the glowing Goldman Sachs building and WTC (a construction site with power where the rest of Manhattan doesn’t have it!) under construction. I think it shows what’s wrong with the country now also—a crumbling infrastructure and the place where, literally, the power is and who’s prepared”.
The resulting photograph, which came through to Quon and her team on Thursday morning, was magical. “We knew we had something to place in the cover template,” she said.
It’s rare to see a view of Manhattan that is so evocative and so new—a single image of the city that tells so many stories. This picture was taken in a moment of crisis for New York, but it will become one of the most iconic, most timeless photographs of the city.
—Kira Pollack Director of Photography, TIME, Nov. 5, 2012
Read more about the cover on NYMag.com.

timelightbox:

A Cover for the Ages

Last week, during one of the worst storms in the city’s history, the staff at New York Magazine was relocated from their downtown offices, which had lost power, to a temporary office in midtown to produce its issue. At 3 p.m. on Tuesday, editor-in-chief Adam Moss called an emergency meeting to start brainstorming ideas to fill out a lineup for an issue that would go to press on Friday.

The challenge was to come up with an entire issue in 48 hours that would not only encompass different photographic approaches, but memorialize a moment in time. As director of photography Jody Quon and her team started brainstorming photographers—work by Jeff Liao, Pari Dukovic, Joseph Rodriguez, Christopher Griffith and others would ultimately appear in the issue—she knew there was one picture that had to be made.

“We needed to show New York from the air,” she said. “We had to make that picture: the delineation of the lights on and off.”

On Wednesday, Leonor Mamanna, a photo editor at New York Magazine, called the Dutch photographer Iwan Baan on the off chance that he’d be in New York. (He is based in Amsterdam). Baan is a superb photographer of urban architecture from all perspectives, including the air. Baan’s work first appeared in the magazine last year.
Mamanna and Baan connected around 4 p.m. on Wednesday. In an email from Haiti this morning, he wrote “Getting to the heliport and getting a car and gas was the most difficult! It was an hour flight to Manhattan, one hour over the city and another hour back, freezing cold, without doors in the heli.”

It takes superb skill to make a picture over the city, out of a helicopter in pitch blackness. How did he do it? “I’ve done this shot of Manhattan many times. So I knew how I wanted to show the two cities,” he wrote. “A pitch black Manhattan and a vivid and thriving city. At the bottom left you see the glowing Goldman Sachs building and WTC (a construction site with power where the rest of Manhattan doesn’t have it!) under construction. I think it shows what’s wrong with the country now also—a crumbling infrastructure and the place where, literally, the power is and who’s prepared”.

The resulting photograph, which came through to Quon and her team on Thursday morning, was magical. “We knew we had something to place in the cover template,” she said.

It’s rare to see a view of Manhattan that is so evocative and so new—a single image of the city that tells so many stories. This picture was taken in a moment of crisis for New York, but it will become one of the most iconic, most timeless photographs of the city.

Kira Pollack Director of Photography, TIME, Nov. 5, 2012

Read more about the cover on NYMag.com.

startup marketing: Branding your startup

cezinho:

Many people discount the importance of brand at startups. I hear founders giving excuses that range from “it’s not necessary for MVP” to simply “it’s fluffy stuff.” Naturally, when I ask them to define their brands, they respond with a list of product features. Very few understand the concept and…

storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona
You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 
The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.
So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?
All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.
It must be daunting.
It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.
Read More

storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona

You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 

The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.

So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?

All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.

It must be daunting.

It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.

Read More

The best use of Pinterest yet: Police mugshots!

bitshare:

imageHey, your food recipe pins are nice and all, but you know what is better? Police mugshots, right on Pinterest. Give it up to The Mercury Police Department in Pottstown to go balls out and use social media to their full advantage, posting police mugshots on the hottest image sharing network around.

Read More

(Source: bitshare)

ICYMI: Black Marble, the highest-res images of Earth at night

bitshare:

imageThe Blue Marble is a famous photograph of the Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972, which showed a super clear image of the Earth illuminated by the Sun in a view that was never seen before. For the past 40 years this image of Earth has been one of a few images that we have, but it has now finally been complimented with The Black Marble, stunning hi-res images of Earth at night.

Read More

(Source: bitshare)

What Is Working For Marketers

A great info graphic from visual.ly on Effective Internet Marketing.
This infographic details the prevailing trends for for effective online marketing, with some strong numbers to support each channel. It is interesting to note that 89% of marketers say that they are maintaining or increasing their budgets that focus on these trends. Perhaps this is because inbound marketing costs 61% LESS per lead than traditional, outbound marketing.
Effective Internet Marketing